California

  • June 12, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Affirms PTAB Ax Of Slide-To-Unlock Patent

    The Federal Circuit has quickly disposed of an appeal over an administrative board ruling that wiped out language in a patent asserted in a small Swedish smartphone company's litigation against Apple and Samsung over claims its founder was the first to develop a "slide to unlock" feature.

  • June 12, 2024

    School Says Declaration Bares Quinn Emanuel Lies In IP Feud

    Columbia University has told the Federal Circuit that a declaration from a former Norton Lifelock Inc. computer scientist shows that the company's former lawyers at Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan LLP are lying about his refusal to testify in the school's decade-long $600 million patent case in Virginia federal court.

  • June 12, 2024

    Internet Co. Hit With $4M Default Judgment Over Tower Bills

    TPT SpeedConnect has been slapped with a nearly $4 million judgment after it stopped footing the bill on some 60 of its license agreements, which allowed the internet service provider to keep its telecom equipment installed on others' towers in exchange for rent.

  • June 12, 2024

    House IP Panel Eyes Transparency For Litigation Funders

    A congressional committee on Wednesday began discussing whether to require more transparency of third-party litigation funding agreements to stem what lawmakers say are abusive patent lawsuits and national security concerns if hostile foreign governments meddle with cases anonymously.

  • June 12, 2024

    Microsoft, OpenAI Call Papers' Suit A 'Copycat' Of NYT's Case

    OpenAI and Microsoft Corp. have asked a New York federal court to toss the bulk of a copyright complaint from eight newspapers that accuses the companies of stealing their content to develop versions of ChatGPT, contending the lawsuit is modeled after one from The New York Times and saying the allegations mischaracterize the technology.

  • June 12, 2024

    Wash. Urges 9th Circ. To Toss Pot Licensure Challenge

    Washington's cannabis authority has asked the Ninth Circuit to reject an effort by an out-of-state retailer to block the state's social equity program from awarding retail licenses, arguing that a motion for preliminary injunction is moot now that the trial court has tossed the entire lawsuit with prejudice.

  • June 12, 2024

    Yale Hospital OK With Merging Suits Over Stalled $435M Sale

    Yale New Haven Hospital has consented to combining two dueling lawsuits over its stalled $435 million deal to buy three Connecticut facilities operated by California-based Prospect Medical Holdings Inc., agreeing that judicial efficiency and economy is best served by consolidating both entities' claims into one proceeding.

  • June 12, 2024

    Wells Fargo Accused Of Mismanaging Forfeited 401(k) Funds

    A former Wells Fargo employee hit the San Francisco-based bank with a proposed class action in California federal court Tuesday, alleging Wells Fargo and its fiduciaries violated the Employee Retirement Income Security Act by using forfeited retirement funds to reduce its own contributions to other workers' 401(k)s.

  • June 12, 2024

    SEIU Unit On Hook For $6M In HCA Healthcare Strike Spat

    An arbitrator has found a Service Employees International Union affiliate liable for more than $6 million in damages for replacement worker costs from a strike, a California hospital said Wednesday, while a union representative told Law360 that the decision is "outrageous and unprecedented."

  • June 12, 2024

    CalPERS Opposes $5B Atty Fee In Musk Pay Fight

    The nation's largest public pension fund lined up Wednesday against a proposed $5 billion-plus fee for stockholder attorneys whose Delaware Court of Chancery suit blocked Tesla CEO Elon Musk's one-time $56 billion compensation plan, one day ahead of a Tesla shareholder vote to resurrect the pay deal.

  • June 12, 2024

    Fired SpaceX Workers Say Musk Runs Co. 'In The Dark Ages'

    Eight former SpaceX employees on Wednesday became the latest to sue the company and CEO Elon Musk alleging a hostile and abusive workplace that demeans women and LGBTQ+ people, saying in California state court they were unlawfully fired when they objected to his conduct.

  • June 12, 2024

    Ex-Navy Employee Pleads Guilty To Contract Bribery Scheme

    Former U.S. Navy civilian official James Soriano has pleaded guilty to accepting bribes from Navy contractors to help steer hundreds of millions of dollars in deals to the companies, after reaching a plea deal with prosecutors.

  • June 12, 2024

    Okta, Investors Reach $60M Deal In Cyberattack Coverup Suit

    Okta Inc. investors have asked a California federal judge to give the first OK to a $60 million settlement reached in a suit alleging the software company misled the certified class about a 2022 cyberattack.

  • June 12, 2024

    QuantumScape Shareholders Seek Initial OK For $47.5M Deal

    Investors of QuantumScape have asked a California federal judge to give the first green light to a $47.5 million settlement to end their class action suit, which alleged published articles revealed the company made false statements about the quality of its batteries and the tests it used to measure performance.

  • June 12, 2024

    9th Circ. Questions Arbitration Carveout For AmEx Workers

    A Ninth Circuit panel seemed inclined Wednesday to force four white former American Express employees to arbitrate their proposed class action claims alleging race bias.

  • June 12, 2024

    Feds Strike Deal Ending $7M FBAR Penalty Cases

    The U.S. government agreed to settle a pair of foreign bank account reporting cases in which it had sought a total of $7 million from a former insurance broker and his wife's estate, according to a court order filed Wednesday in California federal court.

  • June 12, 2024

    CIT Judge Orders 'Comfy' Tariff Case To Trial

    A dispute over whether a baggy, fleece-lined wearable is legally a blanket or clothing is headed to trial after oral arguments Wednesday in the U.S. Court of International Trade failed to resolve questions stemming from a precedential decision on Santa Claus suits.

  • June 12, 2024

    'Natural' Toothpaste Brand Loaded With PFAS, Moms Say

    Natural toothpaste company RiseWell LLC falsely advertised its kids toothpaste as "natural" and "safe to swallow," two mothers alleged Tuesday in a proposed class action, saying a U.S. Department of Defense-certified laboratory test found 750 times more "forever chemicals" in the toothpaste than researchers found in heavily tainted kale.

  • June 12, 2024

    32 AGs Urge Justices Take Up Okla. PBM Law Fight

    Thirty-two attorneys general urged the U.S. Supreme Court to take up Oklahoma's petition for review of a Tenth Circuit decision holding that federal law preempted portions of a state law regulating pharmacy benefit managers, arguing the justices needed to intervene to resolve a circuit split.

  • June 12, 2024

    Money Fight Between Trustee, Law Firm Goes To Mediation

    A money conflict between a Chapter 11 bankruptcy trustee and an outside law firm is going to mediation, the parties announced in a court filing this week. It's the latest move in the saga of Litigation Practice Group, the failed California debt relief law firm that was secretly run by a disbarred lawyer.

  • June 12, 2024

    FBI Told OneTaste Witness To Delete Evidence, Ex-Execs Say

    Two former executives of sexual wellness company OneTaste Inc. said they uncovered "shocking" evidence that an FBI agent told a former employee of the business and key government witness to delete an old email account, allegedly destroying exculpatory evidence in a forced-labor conspiracy case.

  • June 12, 2024

    Magistrate Endorses Axing OT Suit But Allowing 2nd Chance

    A federal magistrate judge advised tossing an unpaid overtime lawsuit against a California cold storage company that specializes in packing agricultural goods, but said the worker should have an opportunity to flesh out their claims.

  • June 12, 2024

    Biden Names Prosecutors, Judge For 3 District Courts

    President Joe Biden announced nominees Wednesday for district courts in Minnesota, California and Pennsylvania.

  • June 11, 2024

    Musk Drops Suit Against OpenAI On Eve Of Dismissal Hearing

    Elon Musk on Tuesday voluntarily dismissed his suit accusing former business partner and OpenAI CEO Sam Altman of betraying his promises to run the artificial intelligence operation as a nonprofit, a move that comes the day before a hearing was set on OpenAI's dismissal bid.

  • June 11, 2024

    Amplitude Execs Face Suit Over Post-IPO Share Inflation

    Current and former insiders of business software maker Amplitude were hit with a shareholder derivative suit claiming they profited from misrepresentations they made about the likelihood of the company sustaining its revenue growth following its initial public offering.

Expert Analysis

  • 9th Circ. Clarifies ERISA Preemption For Healthcare Industry

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    The Ninth Circuit's recent ruling in Bristol SL Holdings v. Cigna notably clarifies the broad scope of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act's preemption of certain state law causes of action, standing to benefit payors and health plan administrators, say attorneys at Troutman Pepper.

  • State Procurement Could Be Key For Calif. Offshore Wind

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    A recent ruling from the California Public Utilities Commission highlights how the state's centralized electricity procurement mechanism could play a critical role in the development of long lead-time resources — in particular, offshore wind — by providing market assurance to developers and reducing utilities' procurement risks, say attorneys at Wilson Sonsini.

  • Calif. Budget Will Likely Have Unexpected Tax Consequences

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    A temporary suspension of net operating loss deductions and business incentive tax credits, likely to be approved on June 15 as part of California’s next budget, may create unanticipated tax liabilities for businesses that modeled recently completed transactions on current law, says Myra Sutanto Shen at Wilson Sonsini.

  • Patent Lessons From 7 Federal Circuit Reversals In May

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    A look at recent cases where the Federal Circuit reversed or vacated decisions by the Patent Trial and Appeal Board or a federal district court provide guidance on how to succeed on appeal by clarifying the obviousness analysis of design patents, the finality of a judgment, and more, say Denise De Mory and Li Guo at Bunsow De Mory.

  • Litigation Inspiration: Attys Can Be Heroic Like Olympians

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    Although litigation won’t earn anyone an Olympic medal in Paris this summer, it can be worthy of the same lasting honor if attorneys exercise focused restraint — seeking both their clients’ interests and those of the court — instead of merely pursuing every advantage short of sanctionable conduct, says Bennett Rawicki at Hilgers Graben.

  • Politics In The Workplace: What Employers Need To Know

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    As the 2024 election approaches and protests continue across the country, employers should be aware of employees' rights — and limits on those rights — related to political speech and activities in the workplace, and be prepared to act proactively to prevent issues before they arise, say attorneys at Littler.

  • Lean Into The 'Great Restoration' To Retain Legal Talent

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    As the “great resignation,” in which employees voluntarily left their jobs in droves, has largely dissipated, legal employers should now work toward the idea of a “great restoration,” adopting strategies to effectively hire, onboard and retain top legal talent, says Molly McGrath at Hiring & Empowering Solutions.

  • 9th Circ. Ruling Shows Lies Must Go To Nature Of Bargain

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    The Ninth Circuit’s recent U.S. v. Milheiser decision, vacating six mail fraud convictions, clarifies that the key question in federal fraud cases is not whether lies were told, but what they were told about — thus requiring defense counsel to rethink their strategies, say Charles Kreindler and Krista Landis at Sheppard Mullin.

  • 4 Ways Businesses Can Address Threat Of Mass Arbitration

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    Attorneys at DLA Piper examine the rise of mass arbitration in light of JAMS' new procedures and guidelines, and provide four steps e-commerce businesses can take when revising their dispute resolution provisions to maximize the chances those revisions will be held enforceable.

  • What High Court Ruling Means For Sexual Harassment Claims

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    In its recent Smith v. Spizzirri decision, the U.S. Supreme Court held that a district court compelling a case to arbitration is obligated to stay the case rather than dismissing it, but this requirement may result in sexual harassment cases not being heard by appellate courts, says Abe Melamed at Signature Resolution.

  • Trademark In Artistic Works 1 Year After Jack Daniel's

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    In the year since the U.S. Supreme Court's Jack Daniel's v. VIP Products ruling, courts have applied Jack Daniel's inconsistently to deny First Amendment protection to artistic works, providing guidance for dismissing trademark claims relating to film and TV titles, say Hardy Ehlers and Neema Sahni at Covington.

  • 9th Circ. Ruling Broadens Sweep Of Securities 'Solicitation'

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    The Ninth Circuit's recent revival of a putative securities fraud class action against Genius Brands for hiring a stock promoter to write favorable articles about it shows that companies should view "solicitation" broadly in considering whether they may have paid someone to urge an investor to purchase a security, say attorneys at Simpson Thacher.

  • NCAA Settlement May End The NIL Model As We Know It

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    The recent House v. NCAA settlement in California federal court, in which the NCAA agreed to allow schools to directly pay March Madness television revenue to their athletes, may send outside name, image and likeness collectives in-house, says Mike Ingersoll at Womble Bond.

  • Opinion

    The FTC And DOJ Should Backtrack On RealPage

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    The antitrust agencies ought to reverse course on their enforcement actions against RealPage, which are based on a faulty legal premise, risk further property shortages and threaten the use of algorithms that are central to the U.S. economy, says Thomas Stratmann at George Mason University.

  • How Federal And State Microfiber Pollution Policy Is Evolving

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    Growing efforts to address synthetic microfiber pollution may create compliance and litigation issues for businesses in the textile and apparel industries, so companies should track developing federal and state legislation and regulation in this space, and should consider associated greenwashing risks, says Arie Feltman-Frank at Jenner & Block.

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