Discrimination

  • May 23, 2024

    Scope Narrows In Pay Bias Suit Against MetLife CEO

    A New York federal judge backtracked on a previous order that left in place all of a female former executive's pay bias claims against MetLife's CEO, limiting the scope of the suit to reflect that he stepped into his role as head of the company only three months before she was terminated.

  • May 23, 2024

    Fisher Phillips Reinforces Calif. Labor And Employment Team

    Fisher Phillips has hired two of counsel in its Irvine, California, office to continue representing employers and helping those clients navigate a range of labor and employment matters.

  • May 22, 2024

    Burrows Warns Against 'Attacks' On Diversity Efforts

    U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission Chair Charlotte Burrows and Commissioner Andrea Lucas both warned attendees at a New York University law school event Wednesday to stay vigilant about federal anti-discrimination law, though they expressed differing perspectives on the hot-button issue of diversity, equity and inclusion initiatives.

  • May 22, 2024

    IT Co. Can't Sink Fired Worker's FMLA Retaliation Suit

    A Florida federal judge declined to hand an information technology company an early win in a former worker's suit claiming he was fired after he took medical leave to treat anxiety, ruling that there are enough disputes over whether the company acted illegally to send the case to trial.

  • May 22, 2024

    Justices' CFPB Alliance May Save SEC Courts, Not Chevron

    A four-justice concurrence to the U.S. Supreme Court's decision upholding the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau's unique funding scheme last week carries implications for other cases pending before the court that challenge the so-called administrative state, or the permanent cadre of regulatory agencies and career government enforcers who hold sway over vast swaths of American economic life.

  • May 22, 2024

    Ex-Mich. Judge Loses Law License Challenge

    A former Detroit trial court judge's failure to object to a magistrate judge's recommendation to toss her claims means she cannot continue to pursue a discrimination and defamation complaint against the state's judicial disciplinary board, a federal judge in Michigan ruled Wednesday.

  • May 22, 2024

    6th Circ. Rejects Ex-Mich. County Worker's Disability Bias Suit

    The Sixth Circuit refused Wednesday to reopen a former Michigan county employee's lawsuit claiming she wasn't allowed to work from home or follow a flexible schedule because of her attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, finding she didn't show these accommodations would help her successfully do her job.

  • May 22, 2024

    6th Circ. Backs FedEx's Jury Win In Black Worker's Bias Suit

    The Sixth Circuit upheld a win Wednesday for FedEx in a suit brought by a Black worker who said she was fired out of racial animus after an altercation with a co-worker, unswayed by her argument that the lower court's handling of her case was fatally flawed.

  • May 22, 2024

    4 Questions About Trailblazing AI Bias Law In Colo.

    Colorado moved to the forefront of regulating artificial intelligence by requiring that developers and users of "high-risk" programs mitigate algorithmic discrimination, enacting a law experts say could serve as a model for other jurisdictions, as well as employers looking to stay ahead of the curve. Here are four questions employment attorneys are asking about the novel statute.  

  • May 22, 2024

    OSU Strikes Deal To Resolve Ex-Prof's Gender Bias Suit

    Ohio State University reached a tentative deal Wednesday with a former marketing professor to end her lawsuit accusing the school of firing her for working with outside clients while male colleagues escaped retribution, a notice in federal court said.

  • May 22, 2024

    Target Of Cyberstalking Loses 5th Circ. ADA Suit

    The Fifth Circuit upheld the dismissal of a former sales specialist's suit claiming a medical supply company violated federal disability law by refusing to separate her from a co-worker whose girlfriend had cyberstalked her, finding the company didn't know about her anxiety until after denying the requests.

  • May 22, 2024

    Amazon Defeats Fired Executive's Equal Pay Suit

    A California federal judge threw out a former Amazon executive's suit alleging the online retail behemoth unlawfully fired her after complaining that a male counterpart earned more than her, ruling that revisions to her suit hadn't fixed the lack of detail previously called out by the court.

  • May 22, 2024

    Md. Clinic Fires Worker With Faulty Vision, EEOC Tells Court

    A medical clinic fired a scheduling assistant on her first day of work after learning she suffers from vision impairments that make it difficult for her to read a computer screen, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission told a Maryland federal court.

  • May 21, 2024

    NC Agency Atty Gets More Time To Prep For Bias Trial

    A North Carolina federal judge shut down the state justice department's bid to stop an attorney from calling witnesses and offering exhibits in her discrimination trial, according to a docket order that appears to give the plaintiff more time to prepare.

  • May 21, 2024

    EEOC Guidance Over Gender Identity Can't Stand, Texas Says

    The Texas attorney general requested Tuesday that a federal judge do away with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's enforcement guidance over gender identity and Title VII, arguing that the agency must be stopped from requiring employers' compliance with pronoun and bathroom accommodations.

  • May 21, 2024

    MLB Scouts' Colo. Age Bias Suit Moved To New York

    A Colorado federal judge refused to dismiss an age bias suit brought against Major League Baseball by a group of 40-and-older scouts and instead transferred the case to New York, saying he was using his discretionary authority because most defendants have no ties to his district.

  • May 21, 2024

    NY High Court Upholds State Abortion Coverage Mandate

    New York's highest court on Tuesday upheld a state law requiring employee health plans to cover medically necessary abortions, finding a 2021 U.S. Supreme Court decision didn't change the state court's determination that an exemption process in the law was constitutional.

  • May 21, 2024

    6th Circ. Won't Restart GM Engineer's Age Bias Suit

    The Sixth Circuit on Tuesday backed General Motors' defeat of an engineer's lawsuit claiming he was harassed and transferred to less lucrative jobs because he's over 50, ruling he failed to show that a supervisor's sporadic comments created a hostile work environment.

  • May 21, 2024

    Food Cos. To Pay $245K To End EEOC Harassment Suit

    Several food companies will pay $245,000 to resolve a lawsuit from the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission alleging a predecessor company's executive harassed employees with crude comments and unwanted touching and then fired workers who complained about it, a filing in California federal court said.

  • May 21, 2024

    7th Circ. Skeptical Of Bias Suit Over Honeywell DEI Video

    The Seventh Circuit appeared reluctant Tuesday to revive a former Honeywell engineer's suit claiming he was unlawfully fired after declining to watch a training film he said discriminated against white people, with judges questioning how the ex-worker could prevail if he never saw the video.

  • May 21, 2024

    Caterpillar To Pay $800K To End DOL Race Bias Probe

    Heavy equipment manufacturer Caterpillar Inc. has agreed to pay $800,000 to resolve U.S. Department of Labor allegations that it refused to hire qualified Black applicants for welding positions at an Illinois facility, the agency said Tuesday.

  • May 21, 2024

    Jury Awards Nurse $200K In Workplace Retaliation Suit

    A Puerto Rico federal jury handed a $200,000 win to a nurse in her suit accusing a government agency of standing by as a co-worker threatened to stab her and fabricated complaints against her after she alleged the colleague's friend sexually harassed her.

  • May 21, 2024

    ABA Faces Racial Bias Complaint Over Diversity Programs

    A conservative nonprofit on Tuesday hit the American Bar Association with a Title VI complaint, claiming a handful of "nefarious" ABA-led programs meant to connect minority law school students with judges are "racially discriminatory."

  • May 21, 2024

    Littler Hires Employment Advice Leader From Lewis Brisbois

    The co-chair of Lewis Brisbois Bisgaard & Smith LLP's employment advice and counseling practice has joined Littler Mendelson PC's Providence, Rhode Island, office, the firm announced.

  • May 21, 2024

    Strategic Hiring Was The New Normal For BigLaw In 2023

    The 400 largest law firms by headcount in the U.S. grew more slowly in 2023 than in the previous two years, while Kirkland & Ellis LLP surpassed the 3,000-attorney threshold, according to the latest Law360 ranking.

Expert Analysis

  • Breaking Down EEOC's Final Rule To Implement The PWFA

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    Attorneys at Littler highlight some of the key provisions of the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's final rule and interpretive guidance implementing the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act, which is expected to be effective June 18, and departures from the proposed rule issued in August 2023.

  • How To Prepare As Employee Data Reporting Deadlines Near

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    As filing deadlines approach, government contractors and private companies alike should familiarize themselves with recent changes to federal and California employee data reporting requirements and think strategically about registration of affirmative action plans to minimize the risk of being audited, say Christopher Durham and Zev Grumet-Morris at Duane Morris.

  • Address Complainants Before They Become Whistleblowers

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    A New York federal court's dismissal of a whistleblower retaliation claim against HSBC Securities last month indicates that ignored complaints to management combined with financial incentives from regulators create the perfect conditions for a concerned and disgruntled employee to make the jump to federal whistleblower, say attorneys at Cooley.

  • Why Corporate DEI Challenges Increasingly Cite Section 1981

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    As legal challenges to corporate diversity, equity and inclusion initiatives increase in the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling on race-conscious college admissions last year, Section 1981 of the Civil Rights Act is supplanting Title VII as conservative activist groups' weapon of choice, say Mike Delikat and Tierra Piens at Orrick.

  • Inside OMB's Update On Race And Ethnicity Data Collection

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    The Office of Management and Budget's new guidelines for agency collection of data on race and ethnicity reflect societal changes and the concerns of certain demographics, but implementation may be significantly burdensome for agencies and employers, say Joanna Colosimo and Bill Osterndorf at DCI Consulting.

  • New Wash. Laws Employers Should Pay Attention To

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    The Washington Legislature ended its session last month after passing substantial laws that should prompt employers to spring into action — including a broadened equal pay law to cover classes beyond gender, narrowed sick leave payment requirements for construction workers and protections for grocery workers after a merger, say Hannah Ard and Alayna Piwonski at Lane Powell.

  • The Shifting Landscape Of Physician Disciplinary Proceedings

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    Though hospitals have historically been able to terminate doctors' medical staff privileges without fear of court interference, recent case law has demonstrated that the tides are turning, especially when there is evidence of unlawful motivations, say Dylan Newton and Michael Horn at Archer & Greiner.

  • Anti-DEI Complaints Filed With EEOC Carry No Legal Weight

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    Recently filed complaints against several companies' diversity, equity and inclusion programs alleging unlawful discrimination against white people do not require a response from the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, and should not stop employers from rooting out ongoing discriminatory practices, says former EEOC general counsel David Lopez.

  • How DEI Programs Are Being Challenged In Court And Beyond

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    In the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court's affirmative action decision last year declaring the consideration of race in university admissions unconstitutional, employers should keep abreast of recent litigation challenging diversity, equity and inclusion training programs, as well as legislation both supporting and opposing DEI initiatives in the workplace, say attorneys at Skadden.

  • What Minority Biz Law Ruling Could Mean For Private DEI

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    A Texas federal court’s recent decision to strike down key provisions of the Minority Business Development Act illustrates the wide-reaching effects of the U.S. Supreme Court's 2023 Students for Fair Admissions v. Harvard decision across legal contexts, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • Texas Hair Bias Ruling Does Not Give Employers A Pass

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    A Texas state court’s recent decision, holding that a school could discipline a student with locs for refusing to cut his hair, should not be interpreted by employers as a license to implement potentially discriminatory grooming policies, says Dawn Holiday at Jackson Walker.

  • Broadway Ruling Puts Discrimination Claims In The Limelight

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    A New York federal court's recent decision in Moore v. Hadestown Broadway that the employers' choice to replace a Black actor with a white actor was shielded by the First Amendment is the latest in a handful of rulings zealously protecting hiring decisions in casting, say Anthony Oncidi and Dixie Morrison at Proskauer.

  • Breaking Down California's New Workplace Violence Law

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    Ilana Morady and Patrick Joyce at Seyfarth discuss several aspects of a new California law that requires employers to create and implement workplace violence prevention plans, including who is covered and the recordkeeping and training requirements that must be in place before the law goes into effect on July 1.