More Employment Coverage

  • April 16, 2024

    Caitlin Clark's WNBA Leap Set To Pay Off, Lift Women's Sports

    Although the first-year WNBA salary of Caitlin Clark will be relatively meager, she is in no financial straits because of dramatic changes to the laws and rules governing college athletes' ability to earn money in recent years, and experts say Clark's ascension is lifting up all of women's sports.

  • April 16, 2024

    Staffing Co. Drops Contract Fight With Panthers Stadium

    The Carolina Panthers' stadium operator and the event staffing company that accused it of wrongly pulling back from an arrangement the parties had made to staff the National Football League team's home games came together Tuesday to drop their dispute from North Carolina federal court.

  • April 16, 2024

    BIPA Judge Laments Blown Discovery Deadlines — Again

    An Illinois federal judge on Monday scolded Union Pacific and the truck drivers suing it over alleged biometric privacy violations for missing a sixth discovery deadline, saying the results of multiple discovery extensions he's allowed over five years of litigation have been "disappointing, to say the least."

  • April 16, 2024

    DraftKings Workers Say Ex-Boss Tried To Lure Them To Rival

    Two DraftKings higher-ups testified Tuesday that their former boss had tried to lure them to join rival sportsbook Fanatics with multimillion-dollar compensation offers, contradicting their former supervisor's claim that he never attempted to get his top lieutenants to help him set up a new office for Fanatics in Los Angeles.

  • April 16, 2024

    FTC To Unveil, Vote On Final Noncompetes Ban April 23

    The Federal Trade Commission gave a one-week heads up Tuesday of its impending unveiling of — and vote on — the final version of a rule that would ban essentially all noncompete agreements employers impose on their workers.

  • April 16, 2024

    NJ Hospital GC Emails Doom $24M Verdict For Surgeons

    The New Jersey Supreme Court on Tuesday vacated a $24.3 million award to a group of neurosurgeons on their claim that a hospital didn't operate in good faith, finding the trial court's admission of emails from the hospital's general counsel and remarks made during closing arguments deprived the hospital of a fair trial.

  • April 16, 2024

    As Hospitals Hire Outside Help, Who's Liable If Patients Sue?

    A medical malpractice case that’s triggered repeated disagreement in Michigan courts underscores the complexity of hospital "agent" liability amid increasing healthcare industry reliance on contractor nurses and doctors.

  • April 16, 2024

    Sheppard Mullin Adds Attys From Greenberg Traurig, Loeb & Loeb

    Sheppard Mullin Richter & Hampton LLP has hired a labor and employment attorney in Houston from Greenberg Traurig LLP and an entertainment attorney in New York from Loeb & Loeb LLP, Sheppard Mullin announced Tuesday.

  • April 16, 2024

    Seyfarth Lands 3 Morgan Lewis Employment Pros In Calif.

    A trio of labor and employment attorneys have moved from Morgan Lewis & Bockius LLP to Seyfarth Shaw LLP in California, the firm said Tuesday.

  • April 16, 2024

    DOL Finalizes Rule To Curb Miners' Exposure To Silica Dust

    A U.S. Department of Labor agency released final regulations Tuesday that tighten limits on miners' exposure to workplace silica dust, a toxic substance that increases the risk of death and chronic health conditions.

  • April 15, 2024

    Resistance To Patent Licenses Drives More Suits, Execs Say

    Companies that generate revenue from patents are seeing less willingness to negotiate in recent years among businesses they approach about potential licenses, requiring more litigation in order to reach agreements, executives from IBM, InterDigital and others said Monday.

  • April 15, 2024

    McDonald's, Workers Battle Over Future Of No-Poach Case

    Workers suing McDonald's over its past use of no-poach provisions in franchise agreements have told an Illinois federal court the fast food chain is trying to slow down the case after the U.S. Supreme Court declined to take up its appeal.

  • April 15, 2024

    Allstate Asks Court To Order Takedown Of 'Smear' Posts

    Allstate asked a Colorado federal judge to order a former independent contractor to remove false statements on his website accusing the insurer of selling customers' personal information to criminals, arguing it has been irreparably injured and that the defendant has signaled he has no plans to stop his smear campaign.

  • April 15, 2024

    Tennis Coach Awarded $2.9M For Defamation In Title IX Suit

    A Quincy University tennis coach has been awarded $2.9 million at the close of a jury trial in Illinois federal court on his counterclaims that a former star recruit spread rumors that he had had sexual relations with a female student tennis player.

  • April 15, 2024

    Security Co. Faces Trial Over Poorly Trained Guards In Kabul

    Allegations that an international security company defrauded the U.S. government by skimping mandatory refresher training for guards protecting diplomatic sites in Afghanistan will be heard at trial after a Georgia federal judge refused to throw out a former supervisor's whistleblower suit.

  • April 15, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    Last week, Delaware justices mulled whether one Chancery Court vice chancellor properly voided four company bylaws — just as another vice chancellor voided one more. Fights among Truth Social investors continued, and shareholders launched new cases involving Macy's, United Airlines, and Clayton Dubilier & Rice LLC and Stone Point Capital LLC.

  • April 15, 2024

    Ex-Medical Co. GC's Suit Against Loeb & Loeb Gets Trimmed

    A Colorado federal court has narrowed a lawsuit by a former medical device company's in-house attorney against Loeb & Loeb LLP and an ex-firm attorney for pursuing claims on behalf of the business alleging that he stole its trade secrets.

  • April 15, 2024

    McElroy Deutsch Must Turn Over Amex Info In Firing Suit

    One of the pair of married former McElroy Deutsch Mulvaney & Carpenter LLP executives accused of jointly stealing millions from the firm has prevailed on a bid for access to credit card statements from several firm leaders in her gender discrimination countersuit.

  • April 15, 2024

    Pittsburgh University Associate GC Returns To Littler

    Littler Mendelson PC has rehired a former associate, who left the firm to join her alma mater as its associate general counsel more than a decade ago, the firm announced Monday.

  • April 15, 2024

    Ballard Spahr Adds Benefits Pro In Ga. From Union Pacific

    An employee benefits and executive compensation attorney has moved to private practice at Ballard Spahr LLP after spending more than a decade in-house at Union Pacific Railroad.

  • April 15, 2024

    Bomb Dog Trainer Links Cancer To Job In Benefits Denial Suit

    A Massachusetts state police trooper says he was diagnosed with cancer after being exposed to hazardous materials while training an explosives-detection dog at Logan Airport, according to a suit seeking line of duty injury benefits.

  • April 12, 2024

    Illinois Firm, Ex-Partner Resolve $2.4M Client-Poaching Suit

    An Illinois insurance defense law firm and a former partner have settled a nearly six-year suit alleging the attorney poached clients while leaving the firm in 2016, with both sides agreeing to dismiss claims the lawyer caused $2.4 million in damages to his former employer.

  • April 12, 2024

    Construction Co. Owner Cops To Causing IRS $2.8M Tax Loss

    A Massachusetts construction company owner pled guilty to running an "off-the-books" cash payroll scheme that cost the federal government $2.8 million in tax losses, the U.S. Department of Justice said.

  • April 11, 2024

    Wells Fargo Wants Ex-CEO's $34M Back-Pay Suit Tossed

    Wells Fargo & Co. has asked a California state court to throw out a lawsuit filed by former CEO Timothy Sloan that seeks $34 million in compensation he alleges was wrongfully withheld from him, a payout the bank maintains it doesn't owe.

  • April 11, 2024

    State Rules Can't 'Obliterate' Federal Rights, Justices Told

    The U.S. Supreme Court must clarify that states are categorically prohibited from requiring plaintiffs to exhaust local administrative remedies before pursuing claims that state officials violated federal rights, several Alabamans told the court Thursday, warning that state prerequisites obliterate federal rights.

Expert Analysis

  • Cannabis Ruling Lights Path For Bankruptcy Protection

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    A recent Massachusetts bankruptcy appellate court ruling in Blumsack v. Harrington leaves the door open for those employed in the cannabis industry to seek bankruptcy relief where certain conditions are met, but rescheduling marijuana as a Schedule III drug may complicate matters, say Jane Haviland and Kathryn Droumbakis at Mintz.

  • This Earth Day, Consider How Your Firm Can Go Greener

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    As Earth Day approaches, law firms and attorneys should consider adopting more sustainable practices to reduce their carbon footprint — from minimizing single-use plastics to purchasing carbon offsets for air travel — which ultimately can also reduce costs for clients, say M’Lynn Phillips and Lisa Walters at IMS Legal Strategies.

  • Circumstantial Evidence Requires A Pointillist Approach

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    Because complex cases with sophisticated defendants are unlikely to reveal much, if any, direct evidence, attorneys must aggregate many pieces of circumstantial evidence into a cohesive narrative — much like the painting technique of pointillism, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • A Look At Global Employee Disconnect Laws For US Counsel

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    As countries worldwide adopt employee right to disconnect laws, U.S. in-house counsel at corporations with a global workforce must develop a comprehensive understanding of the laws' legal and cultural implications, ensuring their companies can safeguard employee welfare while maintaining legal compliance, say Emma Corcoran and Ute Krudewagen at DLA Piper.

  • When Trade Secret Protection And Nat'l Security Converge

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    The Trump administration's anti-espionage program focused on China is over, but federal enforcement efforts to protect trade secrets and U.S. national security continue, and companies doing business in high-risk jurisdictions need to maintain their compliance programs to avoid the risk of being caught in the crosshairs of an investigation, say attorneys at Baker McKenzie.

  • The Merger Cases That Will Matter At ABA Antitrust Meeting

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    While the American Bar Association's Antitrust Spring Meeting this week will cover all types of competition law issues in the U.S. and abroad, expect the federal agencies' recent track record in merger enforcement to be a key area of focus on the official panels and in cocktail party chatter, say attorneys at Freshfields.

  • Playing Hockey Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Nearly a lifetime of playing hockey taught me the importance of avoiding burnout in all aspects of life, and the game ultimately ended up providing me with the balance I needed to maintain success in my legal career, says John Riccione at Taft.

  • A Snapshot Of The Evolving Restrictive Covenant Landscape

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    Rachael Martinez and Brooke Bahlinger at Foley highlight recent trends in the hotly contested regulation and enforcement of noncompetition and related nonsolicitation covenants, and provide guidance on drafting such provisions within the context of stand-alone employment agreements and merger or acquisition transactions.

  • For Lawyers, Pessimism Should Be A Job Skill, Not A Life Skill

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    A pessimistic mindset allows attorneys to be effective advocates for their clients, but it can come with serious costs for their personal well-being, so it’s crucial to exercise strategies that produce flexible optimism and connect lawyers with their core values, says Krista Larson at Stinson.

  • Requiring Leave To File Amicus Briefs Is A Bad Idea

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    A proposal to amend the Federal Rules of Appellate Procedure that would require parties to get court permission before filing federal amicus briefs would eliminate the long-standing practice of consent filing and thereby make the process less open and democratic, says Lawrence Ebner at the Atlantic Legal Foundation and DRI Center.

  • Beware OSHA's Aggressive Stance Toward Safety Violations

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    The solicitor of labor's recent enforcement report shows the Occupational Safety and Health Administration will increasingly consider creative enforcement measures and even criminal referrals to hold employers accountable for workplace safety infractions, say Ronald Taylor and Page Kim at Venable.

  • 4 Ways To Motivate Junior Attorneys To Bring Their Best

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    As Gen Z and younger millennial attorneys increasingly express dissatisfaction with their work and head for the exits, the lawyers who manage them must understand and attend to their needs and priorities to boost engagement and increase retention, says Stacey Schwartz at Katten.

  • The Tricky Implications Of New Calif. Noncompete Laws

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    Two new California noncompete laws that ban certain out-of-state agreements and require employers to notify certain workers raise novel issues related to mergers and acquisitions, and pose particular challenges for technology companies, says John Viola at Thompson Coburn.