More Employment Coverage

  • April 26, 2024

    Ex-McKinsey Partner Says Firm Made Him Opioids 'Scapegoat'

    A former McKinsey & Co. partner lobbed defamation claims at the consulting firm, claiming Friday that it lied to the government and the public about his purported role in deleting evidence amid government investigations into the firm's work with opioid manufacturers, an alleged scheme designed to make him the "scapegoat."

  • April 26, 2024

    St. John's Hoops Players Say NCAA Can't Block Their Play

    Two St. John's University basketball players sued the NCAA Friday in New York, saying it arbitrarily denied them waivers for its "five-year rule" that prohibits student-athletes from competing in more than four seasons in any one sport, after they lost a season during the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • April 26, 2024

    Frito-Lay Subcontractors Hit With $72M Factory Death Verdict

    A Dallas County jury has awarded a nearly $72 million verdict to the family of a man who plunged to his death at a Frito-Lay facility, finding that his employer and another subcontractor working at the facility were liable for the accident.

  • April 26, 2024

    Mich. To Pay $55M In Suit Over COVID-19 Aid Clawbacks

    Michigan's unemployment insurance agency will pay $55 million to people whose benefits were improperly clawed back without notice during the pandemic and reform its collection practices to ensure due process under a settlement that has received initial approval from a state judge.

  • April 26, 2024

    Ex-Walmart Worker Files Ill. BIPA Suit Over Fingerprint Scans

    Walmart is violating biometric privacy laws by gathering employees' fingerprint scans when clocking in for shifts and sharing them with various third-party identity service providers without written consent, a former employee alleges in a putative class suit.

  • April 26, 2024

    FTC's Bedoya Says Labor Concerns In Mergers Matter

    Federal Trade Commissioner Alvaro Bedoya said Friday that it's important for enforcers to consider the impact mergers can have on labor, even if they never did in the past, contending that concentration can lead to lower wages and dangerous working conditions.

  • April 26, 2024

    Truist Unit Survives Early Dismissal Bid In NC Poaching Suit

    Truist Financial Corp. and its real estate finance arm can move forward with the bulk of their suit accusing three former executives of absconding for a competitor with several dozen colleagues in tow, after North Carolina's business court judge largely denied the defendants an early exit.

  • April 26, 2024

    Ex-Conn. Hospital Worker Says He Was Assaulted, Then Fired

    Stamford Health Inc. terminated a hospital maintenance worker soon after he suffered a violent assault in the workplace, claiming that he abandoned his job even though it failed to provide him with necessary paperwork to take medical leave, according to an amended lawsuit filed Friday in Connecticut federal court.

  • April 26, 2024

    Off The Bench: Nassar Victims, Bush V. NCAA, New ACC Suit

    In this week's Off The Bench, the U.S. Department of Justice cuts a nine-figure deal for botching its sexual abuse investigation of disgraced USA Gymnastics physician Larry Nassar, college football legend Reggie Bush plows ahead with an NCAA defamation suit despite reclaiming his Heisman trophy, and Florida sues the ACC to detail its lucrative media rights contracts.

  • April 26, 2024

    11th Circ. Finds No Anti-Black Juror Bias In Murder Trial

    The Eleventh Circuit has denied a new trial to a Mexican man arguing prosecutors used all but one of their peremptory strikes to exclude potential jurors who were Black or Hispanic at the trial in Georgia where he was sentenced to life in prison for murdering a whistleblower connected to his work.

  • April 26, 2024

    Ex-BP Commodities Trader Says Co. Reneged On Bonus

    A former BP commodities trader accused the company in Texas federal court of shorting him to the tune of $6 million when it abruptly fired him in January 2022 and paid him a smaller bonus than the $11 million he expected to receive.

  • April 26, 2024

    JPMorgan Says Ex-Adviser Is Pilfering Clients For Wells Fargo

    J.P. Morgan has accused a former investment management adviser of trying to poach clients for her new job at a competing Wells Fargo unit, saying she's been making unsolicited phone calls and sending emails to convince clients to leave in breach of her employment contract.

  • April 25, 2024

    Tesla Says Investors May Want To Influence Shareholder Vote

    Tesla on Thursday questioned the motives of investors who want billions of dollars in company stock put into a trust, saying that their push to hasten the court's decision in their suit over Elon Musk's compensation plan raises concerns that they want to "elicit commentary" ahead of a shareholder meeting.

  • April 25, 2024

    Lockheed Martin Sued By Widow Over 'Toxic Stew' At Facility

    The widow of a former Lockheed Martin Corp. employee sued the aerospace defense company on Wednesday in Florida federal court, alleging her husband died because of Lockheed's "reckless mismanagement" of dangerous chemicals at a weapons manufacturing facility.

  • April 25, 2024

    Judge Reopens Allstate Trade Secrets Case Against Ex-Agent

    A Colorado federal judge has partially reopened a case alleging that a former Allstate exclusive agent poached customers for another agency, directing the ex-agent to explain why he shouldn't be held in contempt in the lawsuit.

  • April 25, 2024

    Judge Questions Equal Payouts In $9M White Castle BIPA Deal

    An Illinois federal judge said Thursday he would grant preliminary approval to a $9.4 million settlement resolving a class action targeting White Castle's biometric timekeeping practices but added he wants more information on why all employees are poised to receive the same recovery regardless of how long they worked there.

  • April 25, 2024

    Mich. Justices Reject Park Ranger's Disability Benefits Appeal

    Two Michigan Supreme Court justices on Thursday agreed with the rest of the bench not to rule on a park ranger's claims that state retirement law unconstitutionally prevents him from challenging his disability benefit denial, but called out a lower court's "circular" reasoning for finding him ineligible.

  • April 25, 2024

    NJ Couple Convicted Of Luring Immigrants Into Forced Labor

    A New Jersey federal jury has convicted a Burlington County couple on charges related to luring two undocumented immigrants to the United States and forcing them to perform domestic labor and childcare in their home, federal prosecutors announced Wednesday.

  • April 25, 2024

    Jury Rejects Ex-Medical Co. GC's Suit Against Loeb & Loeb

    A Colorado federal jury has rejected a former in-house attorney's claim that Loeb & Loeb LLP and one of its ex-partners acted outrageously when they filed a lawsuit on behalf of a medical device company accusing him of stealing trade secrets.

  • April 25, 2024

    Pa. Justices OK Teacher 'Character' Test For Suspended Atty

    The Supreme Court of Pennsylvania on Thursday upheld a lower court's ruling that an ex-attorney's disciplinary records can be used by the state Department of Education when evaluating whether that attorney has the "good moral character" to get a teaching license.

  • April 25, 2024

    Marshall Dennehey Gains Employment Ace From NJ Boutique

    Marshall Dennehey PC has added an employment law and trial attorney to its Mount Laurel, New Jersey, roster who came aboard from Flahive Mueller LLC.

  • April 24, 2024

    NC Biz Court Trims School Food Servicer's Noncompete Suit

    The North Carolina Business Court on Wednesday pared a cafeteria food provider's lawsuit alleging a former sales director absconded with confidential information to a rival business, reasoning the Tar Heel State's laws aren't applicable over alleged out-of-state conduct.

  • April 24, 2024

    Takeaways From The FTC's Noncompetes Ban

    The first legal challenges to the Federal Trade Commission's new ban on essentially all noncompete agreements that employers impose on workers have already been filed, but questions remain, not just on the rule's legal viability, but also on the likelihood of follow-on rulemakings and the rule's exact reach.

  • April 24, 2024

    Panel Reinstates Suit Over Hospital Workers' COVID Deaths

    A New Jersey appellate panel on Wednesday reinstated a suit seeking to hold two hospitals liable for the COVID-19 deaths of a hospital aide and a nurse during the early stages of the pandemic, saying the trial judge made improper findings of fact regarding allegedly reckless conduct.

  • April 24, 2024

    UPMC Affiliate Can't Avoid False Claims Suit Over NIH Grant

    A research foundation affiliated with a University of Pittsburgh Medical Center hospital can't duck a former employee's claims that the foundation mishandled grant money and fired her for raising concerns, though UPMC itself is off the hook, a federal judge ruled Wednesday.

Expert Analysis

  • Assessing Merger Guideline Feedback With Machine Learning

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    Large language modeling appears to show that public sentiment matches agency intent around the new merger control guidelines from the Federal Trade Commission and U.S. Justice Department, says Andrew Sfekas at Cornerstone Research.

  • Understanding And Working With The Millennials On Your Jury

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    Every trial attorney will be facing a greater proportion of millennials on their jury, as they now comprise the largest generation in the U.S., and winning them over requires an understanding of their views on politics, corporations and damages, says Clint Townson at Townson Litigation Consulting.

  • Grant Compliance Takeaways From Ga. Tech's FCA Settlement

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    Georgia Tech’s recent False Claims Act settlement over its failure to detect compliance shortcomings in a grant program was unique in that it involved a voluntary repayment of funds prior to the resolution, offering a few key lessons for universities receiving research funding from the government, says Jonathan Porter at Husch Blackwell.

  • Competing In Dressage Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My lifelong participation in the sport of dressage — often called ballet on horses — has proven that several skills developed through training and competition are transferable to legal work, especially the ability to harness focus, persistence and versatility when negotiating a deal, says Stephanie Coco at V&E.

  • Deferral Pointers For Employers After $700M Ohtani Deal

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    Darren Goodman and Christine Osvald-Mruz at Lowenstein Sandler examine the legal consequences of Shohei Ohtani's $700 million, 10-year contract with the Los Angeles Dodgers — a high-profile example of nonqualified deferred compensation — and offer lessons for employers of all sizes interested in similar deals.

  • The Legal Industry Needs A Cybersecurity Paradigm Shift

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    As law firms face ever-increasing risks of cyberattacks and ransomware incidents, the legal industry must implement robust cybersecurity measures and privacy-centric practices to preserve attorney-client privilege, safeguard client trust and uphold the profession’s integrity, says Ryan Paterson at Unplugged.

  • 5 Reasons Associates Shouldn't Take A Job Just For Money

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    As a number of BigLaw firms increase salary scales for early-career attorneys, law students and lateral associates considering new job offers should weigh several key factors that may matter more than financial compensation, say Albert Tawil at Lateral Hub and Ruvin Levavi at Power Forward.

  • New SDNY Whistleblower Program May Be A Game-Changer

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    A new pilot program in the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York promises to immunize from prosecution certain individuals who blow the whistle on financial crimes and corruption, and if similar self-disclosure programs are any indication, this significant new policy may measurably increase white collar investigations, say attorneys at Paul Hastings.

  • Directors And Officers Face Unique AI-Related Risks

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    As privacy, intellectual property and discrimination lawsuits focusing on artificial intelligence increase, corporate directors and officers must stay aware of associated risks, including those related to compliance, litigation and cybersecurity, says Jonathan Meer at Wilson Elser.

  • Playing Competitive Tennis Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My experience playing competitive tennis has highlighted why prioritizing exercise and stress relief, maintaining perspective under pressure, and supporting colleagues in pursuit of a common goal are all key aspects of championing a successful legal career, says Madhumita Datta at Lowenstein Sandler.

  • Best Employer Practices Under Whistleblower Protection Act

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    The Whistleblower Protection Act provides important protections for employees who report wrongdoing in the federal government, and employers should take steps to ensure compliance with the WPA, as these protections are essential to promoting a workplace culture of ethics and accountability, says Emory Moore at Honigman.

  • NY, Del. May Be Trending Against Noncompete Enforceability

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    While neither New York nor Delaware has statutory restrictions on noncompete provisions, recent legislative actions and judicial decisions indicate a trend against enforcement of restrictive covenants in both equity award and employment agreements, says Irene Bassock at Cohen Buckmann.

  • The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Djerassi On Super Bowl 52

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    Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas Judge Ramy Djerassi discusses how Super Bowl 52, in which the Philadelphia Eagles prevailed over the New England Patriots, provides an apt metaphor for alternative dispute resolution processes in commercial business cases.

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