More Employment Coverage

  • May 23, 2024

    NCAA, Athletes Settle NIL Class Action Over Billions In Pay

    The NCAA said Thursday it has reached a settlement with the former college athletes who had filed an antitrust class action demanding billions in potential compensation allegedly denied to them for decades before the U.S. Supreme Court overturned the NCAA's compensation ban.

  • May 23, 2024

    Conn. Marketing Co., Competitor Settle Exec Poaching Suit

    The Connecticut-based healthcare marketing firm Primacy LLC has reached a settlement with a competitor it accused of poaching a top executive, weeks after bringing a trade secrets lawsuit in federal court.

  • May 23, 2024

    TRO Against Ex-TD Bank Employees Revised

    A federal judge in Connecticut walked back part of a temporary restraining order against ex-TD Bank employees accused of siphoning $25 million in business to Raymond James Financial, saying the previous order may have been more restrictive than necessary.

  • May 23, 2024

    Lockheed Urges 11th Circ. To Affirm Win In Solvent Suit

    Lockheed Martin Corp. asked the Eleventh Circuit on Wednesday to uphold a Florida district court's rejection of a proposed expert's testimony purporting to link a now-deceased former employee's multiple sclerosis to her work-related exposure to industrial solvents.

  • May 23, 2024

    LA Jury Awards $58M To Train Yard Worker Injured In Slip

    A train yard worker was awarded over $58 million this week by a Los Angeles jury due to an injury that he says occurred when he slipped on top of a wet train car, which resulted in a fractured foot and a diagnosis of complex regional pain syndrome. 

  • May 23, 2024

    Legal Marketer, Ark. Firm Agree To End Trade Secrets Suit

    A legal marketing business has agreed to dismiss a Georgia federal lawsuit accusing an Arkansas law firm and others of stealing and profiting off its trade secrets, including a database of client leads for mass torts over talcum powder and heartburn medication.

  • May 23, 2024

    Ambulance Co. Owner Accused Of $1M Pandemic Loan Fraud

    The owner of a California ambulance company who was charged last year with tax evasion and filing false returns has been further accused of fraudulently securing $1 million from federal pandemic relief loan programs, according to the U.S. Department of Justice.

  • May 22, 2024

    Ex-Google Manager Says He Lost Job For Reporting Nepotism

    A former Google senior manager has sued the search giant in California state court, claiming he was fired for reporting on superiors using their positions to secure sought-after spots for their children in Google's apprentice program.

  • May 22, 2024

    Conn. Judge Doubts Restaurant's Insurance Beef Is Stale

    Connecticut's chief intermediate appellate court judge appeared skeptical Wednesday of Liberty Mutual Insurance Co.'s position that a restaurant is barred from suing over the denial of coverage for a worker's hand injury, suggesting that previous litigation over the worker's compensation policy has no bearing on the current suit. 

  • May 22, 2024

    Ex-Citi Exec Says She Was Asked To Lie To OCC

    A former Citibank NA managing director hired to bring the bank into compliance with regulatory obligations has accused the bank and its chief operating officer of wrongful termination and retaliation in a suit Wednesday, alleging she was fired for not reporting false information to authorities.

  • May 22, 2024

    CBRE Calls Exec's Noncompete Right Fit In A Small World

    A Texas appellate court wondered Wednesday whether a temporary injunction that seemingly bars a former CBRE executive from working in his trade anywhere in the world goes too far, and questioned the validity of the underlying noncompete agreement at the center of the legal battle.

  • May 22, 2024

    Justices' CFPB Alliance May Save SEC Courts, Not Chevron

    A four-justice concurrence to the U.S. Supreme Court's decision upholding the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau's unique funding scheme last week carries implications for other cases pending before the court that challenge the so-called administrative state, or the permanent cadre of regulatory agencies and career government enforcers who hold sway over vast swaths of American economic life.

  • May 22, 2024

    Ga. Hospital Says Own Bylaws Are Not Grounds For Suit

    Counsel for a major Georgia hospital urged a state appellate court Wednesday to shut down a lawsuit from a doctor who said the medical center poached his patients, arguing that the hospital gets to "enjoy broad authority" about whom its doctors treat.

  • May 22, 2024

    Insurance Co. Says Ex-Underwriter 'Lured' Away Colleagues

    An insurance brokerage and its affiliate have accused a former high-ranking company official of decamping for a competitor and encouraging colleagues to follow suit, according to a complaint designated Wednesday to North Carolina Business Court.

  • May 22, 2024

    NJ Panel Revives Town IT Chief's Whistleblower Suit

    A New Jersey trial court wrongly granted summary judgment to the Borough of Ridgefield in a whistleblower suit claiming wrongful termination, an appeals panel ruled Wednesday, saying the lower court too readily accepted the municipality's argument that the firing was for economic reasons.

  • May 22, 2024

    Proskauer Employment Pro Jumps To Faegre Drinker In NY

    A longtime Proskauer Rose LLP partner and former co-head of its restrictive covenants, trade secrets and unfair competition group jumped to Faegre Drinker Biddle & Reath LLP in New York, the firm announced Wednesday.

  • May 22, 2024

    DeSantis Ducks Voters' Suit Over Fla. Prosecutor Suspension

    A Florida federal judge on Wednesday tossed voters' attempt to undo Gov. Ron DeSantis' suspension of elected prosecutor Monique Worrell, finding that the voters had not shown they were injured by the suspension.

  • May 21, 2024

    Texas Panel Says Mallory Ruling Has No Home There

    A Texas appellate court has upheld a ruling preventing a Dallas car repair services company from litigating a trade secrets case there against a Michigan rival over allegedly hiring away a former executive, holding that the U.S. Supreme Court's Mallory decision last year doesn't do much in Texas.

  • May 21, 2024

    Fla. Scientist Fights Contempt Ruling In Data Theft Suit

    A Florida Everglades scientist urged a state appeals court Tuesday to reverse a contempt ruling against him over violating an injunction to preserve computer data from his prior job, saying that the order was ambiguous and that the lower court wrongly appointed opposing counsel to prosecute the violation.

  • May 21, 2024

    Ship Engineers Take Case Against Shipbuilders To 4th Circ.

    A pair of naval engineers are challenging a Virginia federal judge's decision to toss their proposed class action accusing a collection of shipbuilding military contractors of entering into secret "no-poach" agreements, asking the Fourth Circuit to take up their appeal in a new filing.

  • May 21, 2024

    UMich Punished Officer For Talking To Press, Jury Finds

    A jury in Detroit federal court on Tuesday awarded a University of Michigan police officer $300,000 in emotional distress damages, finding the school unlawfully retaliated against him after he spoke with a journalist about its alleged mishandling of a sexual assault report.

  • May 21, 2024

    College QB Sues Gators' Coach For False $13.9M NIL Deal

    Former prospective University of Florida Gators quarterback Jaden Rashada alleged in a federal lawsuit Tuesday that the football coach and boosters lured him to the university with false promises of a $13.85 million name, image and likeness deal that cost him a legitimate deal he had lined up at a different school.

  • May 21, 2024

    Split Fed. Circ. Revives IP Suit Against Nokia Over Standing

    A split Federal Circuit on Tuesday threw out a lower court decision that found an inventor's company didn't have standing to sue Nokia, Cisco and ADVA over a fiber optic patent, saying it was unclear if the company had the rights to the patent.

  • May 21, 2024

    Ex-EnCore GC Joins Fisher Phillips' Gov't Relations Team

    Fisher Phillips announced Tuesday that it has hired for its government relations practice group an attorney who was EnCore Energy Corp.'s former general counsel and has extensive experience in the public sector, including a stint as principal deputy solicitor for the U.S. Department of the Interior.

  • May 21, 2024

    Bottini & Bottini Gets Atty Fee Suit Sent To Arbitration

    A Texas attorney must arbitrate his $730,000 fee suit against Bottini & Bottini Inc., a federal judge in the Lone Star State has ordered, finding the settlement agreement underlying the lawyer's claims included a binding arbitration clause despite the attorney not personally signing the document.

Expert Analysis

  • Args In APA Case Amplify Justices' Focus On Agency Power

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    In arguments last week in Corner Post v. Federal Reserve, the U.S. Supreme Court justices paid particular importance to the possible ripple effects of their decision, which will address when a facial challenge to long-standing federal rules under the Administrative Procedure Act first accrues and could thus unleash a flood of new lawsuits, say attorneys at Snell & Wilmer.

  • Mitigating Whistleblower Risks After High Court UBS Ruling

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    While it is always good practice for companies to periodically review whistleblower trainings, policies and procedures, the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent whistleblower-friendly ruling in Murray v. UBS Securities helps demonstrate their importance in reducing litigation risk, say attorneys at Arnold & Porter.

  • Future Not Looking Bright For Calif. Employee Nonsolicits

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    California's new legislation imposing potentially harsh consequences on employers for attempting to enforce noncompetes raises questions about the fate of employee nonsolicitation agreements — and both federal and state court decisions suggest the days of the latter may be numbered, say Anthony Oncidi and Philippe Lebel at Proskauer.

  • 6 Pointers For Attys To Build Trust, Credibility On Social Media

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    In an era of information overload, attorneys can use social media strategically — from making infographics to leveraging targeted advertising — to cut through the noise and establish a reputation among current and potential clients, says Marly Broudie at SocialEyes Communications.

  • Del. Ruling Stands Out In Thorny Noncompete Landscape

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    In Cantor Fitzgerald v. Ainslie, the Delaware Supreme Court last month upheld the enforceability of forfeiture-for-competition provisions in limited partnership agreements, providing a noteworthy opinion amid a time of increasing disfavor toward noncompetes and following a string of Chancery Court rulings deeming them unreasonable, say Margaret Butler and Steven Goldberg at BakerHostetler.

  • A Post-Mortem Analysis Of Stroock's Demise

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    After the dissolution of 147-year-old firm Stroock late last year shook up the legal world, a post-mortem analysis of the data reveals a long list of warning signs preceding the firm’s collapse — and provides some insight into how other firms might avoid the same disastrous fate, says Craig Savitzky at Leopard Solutions.

  • Reassessing Trade Secrets Amid Proposed Noncompete Ban

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    The Federal Trade Commission's proposed ban on noncompete agreements as well as state bans make it prudent for businesses to reevaluate and reinvigorate approaches to trade secret protection, including knowing what information employees are providing to vendors, and making sure confidentiality agreements are put in place before information is shared, says Rob Jensen at Wolf Greenfield.

  • Considering The Logical Extremes Of Your Legal Argument

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    Recent oral arguments in the federal election interference case against former President Donald Trump highlighted the age-old technique of extending an argument to its logical limit — a principle that is still important for attorneys to consider in preparing their cases, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • 2nd Circ. Ruling Will Guide Social Media Account Ownership

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    The Second Circuit’s recent decision in JLM Couture v. Gutman — which held that ownership of social media accounts must be resolved using traditional property law analysis — will guide employers and employees alike in future cases, and underscores the importance of express agreements in establishing ownership of social media accounts, says Joshua Glasgow at Phillips Lytle.

  • Storytelling Strategies To Defuse Courtroom Conspiracies

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    Misinformation continues to proliferate in all sectors of society, including in the courtroom, as jurors try to fill in the gaps of incomplete trial narratives — underscoring the need for attorneys to tell a complete, consistent and credible story before and during trial, says David Metz at IMS Legal Strategies.

  • HR Antitrust Compliance Crucial Amid DOJ Scrutiny

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    The Justice Department's Antitrust Division recently announced a required human resources component for antitrust compliance programs, which means companies should evaluate their policies to prevent, detect and remediate potential violations as they add training for HR professionals, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Calif. Disclosure Update Adds To Employer Trial Prep Burden

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    Though California’s recently updated litigation disclosure procedures may streamline some aspects of employment suits filed in the state, plaintiffs' new ability to demand a wider range of information on a tighter timeline will burden companies with the need to invest more resources into investigating cases much earlier in the process, says Jeffrey Horton Thomas at Fox Rothschild.

  • Mass Arb. Rule Changes May Be A Hindrance For Consumers

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    The American Arbitration Association's recent changes to its mass arbitration supplementary rules and fee schedule, including a shift from filing fees to initiation and per-case fees, may reduce consumers' ability to counteract businesses' mandatory arbitration agreements, say Eduard Korsinsky and Alexander Krot at Levi & Korsinsky.

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