Wage & Hour

  • May 01, 2024

    DOL's OT Rule Doesn't Touch Trucker Exemption

    Certain interstate truck drivers remain exempt from overtime under federal labor law, even as the U.S. Department of Labor has issued a new final rule addressing overtime exemptions for other workers. Here, Law360 explores the motor carrier exemption.

  • May 01, 2024

    Acting Labor Sec. Defends Status, Rules At Tense Hearing

    Acting Labor Secretary Julie Su defended her U.S. Department of Labor role and recent agency rules at a U.S. House committee hearing on Wednesday from Republicans who accused her of serving through a "loophole" and who questioned the legality of actions under her leadership.

  • May 01, 2024

    Fired HR Worker Hits Financial Co. With Age, Sex Bias Suit

    A financial services company laid off a human resources worker after she took federal medical leave and in retaliation for her repeated complaints about pay disparities between herself and younger, male employees, according to a lawsuit filed in Colorado federal court.

  • May 01, 2024

    Overtime Theft Scheme Earns Ex-Mass. Trooper 3 Years

    The former second-in-command of a Massachusetts state police traffic safety unit was sentenced to three years in prison for his role in a widespread conspiracy to steal federally funded overtime through no-work shifts.

  • May 01, 2024

    Ala. Insurance Co. Settles Adjuster's Overtime Suit

    An Alabama insurance agency will pay a settlement to end a claims adjuster's suit accusing it of failing to pay adjusters overtime wages for time they spent inspecting and assessing property damage, according to court papers.

  • May 01, 2024

    Teachers Say Pa. Can't Nix Equal Pay Suit

    A Pennsylvania school district can't snag a win on claims that it paid women teachers less than their male colleagues because it is clear that while the teachers performed comparable work, the pay was different, the women told a federal court.

  • May 01, 2024

    7th Circ. Backs Dismissal Of Ill. City Worker's Equal Pay Suit

    The Seventh Circuit declined to give an Illinois city diversity officer a second chance at her sex bias suit that claimed she was terminated after complaining that male co-workers were paid more for lighter workloads, ruling she didn't adequately back up her allegations.

  • May 01, 2024

    Texas Oil Field Supply Co. Wants OT Suit Arbitrated

    An ex-worker for a Texas oil field equipment supply company signed a valid agreement to arbitrate any employment disputes, the company said in asking a federal judge to send his unpaid overtime claims into arbitration.

  • April 30, 2024

    Foreign Farmworker Protection Rule Could Frustrate Hiring

    A new U.S. Department of Labor regulation boosting labor protections for H-2A visa workers has industry experts worried that it could frustrate a common practice of sharing employees within the agricultural industry, and pose hiring challenges for farmers and ranchers.

  • April 30, 2024

    Kroger, Albertsons Say FTC Distorts Markets In Merger Case

    Kroger and Albertsons told an Oregon federal court to reject a pending merger challenge by the Federal Trade Commission and a group of states, saying it distorts the competitive landscape for the grocery and labor markets.

  • April 30, 2024

    Staffing Firm Can't Send Misclassification Case To Arbitration

    A worker didn't enter an arbitration agreement with the oil and gas production company it accused of misclassifying him as an independent contractor and therefore an intervenor staffing company can't push the suit out of court, a New Mexico federal judge ruled.

  • April 30, 2024

    Wash. Job Applicant's Pay Transparency Suit Tossed For Now

    A Washington federal judge tossed a job applicant's state pay transparency suit against a rent-to-own retailer, ruling the job-seeker didn't prove how the company's failure to include pay information in a job listing negatively affected him.

  • April 30, 2024

    10th Circ. Says Biden Can Raise Contractors' Minimum Wage

    President Joe Biden's minimum hourly wage increase for federal contractors to $15 is intertwined with furthering the economy and is therefore supported by the Procurement Act, a split Tenth Circuit panel ruled Tuesday, agreeing with a Colorado federal court to keep the wage bump.

  • April 30, 2024

    DOL Fines Texas Nonprofit For Underpaying Disabled Workers

    A nonprofit in Texas paid more than $52,000 in back wages for denying 134 workers with disabilities the subminimum wage rate, the U.S. Department of Labor announced Tuesday.

  • April 30, 2024

    Money Can't Buy Unfair End To IHOP Tips Suit, Judge Says

    A New York federal judge rejected a proposed $100,000 settlement between IHOP franchises and an ex-waiter accusing them of paying servers' overtime wages with tips, saying several nonmonetary terms seem unfair and that "money can buy a lot of things, but not a license to violate the law." 

  • April 30, 2024

    DOL Asks 7th Circ. To Expand Unpaid Travel Time Ruling

    The U.S. Department of Labor urged the Seventh Circuit to affirm a lower court's ruling that a staffing firm must pay tradespeople for travel time between overnight jobs during normal working hours, and asked the court to extend the ruling to apply to travel outside regular work hours.

  • April 30, 2024

    How Fee-Shifting Clauses Can Sink An Arbitration Pact

    Arbitration agreements workers must sign as a job requirement may be found unenforceable if they include a fee-shifting provision that could make the out-of-court process so costly that they chill enforcement of employment laws, attorneys told Law360.

  • April 29, 2024

    3 Tips For Navigating DOL's New OT Rule

    Employers should audit their compensation data and get ahead of morale challenges to prepare for complying with the U.S. Department of Labor's just-released final rule on overtime-exempt professionals. Here, Law360 offers tips for employers to manage workforce changes related to the new regulation.

  • April 29, 2024

    Business Groups Rally Against Independent Contractor Rule

    The U.S. Department of Labor's rule determining whether workers are employees or independent contractors is confusing and lacks reason, a slew of business groups told a Texas federal court, backing the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and other entities' bid to nix the rule.

  • April 29, 2024

    Restaurateurs Say DOL Drew Tipped Work 'Line' Unfairly

    The U.S. Department of Labor and two restaurant groups told the Fifth Circuit on Monday that they agreed the department's rule regulating what's tipped and nontipped work "is fundamentally a line-drawing problem," but disagreed on whether that "line" had been drawn appropriately under federal statutes.

  • April 29, 2024

    Ex-Manager Accuses Hallmark Of Retaliation For Wage Claims

    A former manager said he was illegally let go for speaking up about Hallmark's alleged violations of a minimum wage ordinance, telling a California state court Monday that the greeting card giant terminated him for supposedly saying an expletive when profanity use is "embedded in Hallmark's culture."

  • April 29, 2024

    NYC Medical College Asks Court to Toss Unpaid OT Suit

    A Bronx, New York, medical college urged a federal judge to throw out a former research coordinator's proposed class and collective action alleging he and his co-workers worked 45- to 50-hour weeks without overtime wages, saying the ex-worker didn't point to specific weeks in which he failed to receive overtime.

  • April 29, 2024

    Wells Fargo Didn't Pay For Out-Of-Shift Work, Suit Says

    Wells Fargo has for years enforced a companywide policy that denies overtime pay to workers tasked with opening and closing its branches, according to a lawsuit filed by a former employee at one of the bank's Atlanta-area locations.

  • April 29, 2024

    Calif. Judge OKs $1M Deal In Strawberry Pickers' Wage Suit

    A California federal court gave the first sign-off to a $1 million deal that would end hundreds of strawberry pickers' claims that they were forced to work at unsafe speeds for allegedly little pay.

  • April 29, 2024

    DOL Issues Guidance On Using AI In The Workplace

    The U.S. Department of Labor issued guidance Monday on how employers can carefully use artificial intelligence, saying a lack of human eyes could create a domino effect and lead to violations of federal wage and leave laws.

Expert Analysis

  • Check Onboarding Docs To Protect Arbitration Agreements

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    The California Court of Appeal's recent Alberto v. Cambrian Homecare decision opens a new and unexpected avenue of attack on employment arbitration agreements in California — using other employment-related agreements to render otherwise enforceable arbitration agreements unenforceable, say Morgan Forsey and Ian Michalak at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Remote Work Considerations In A Post-Pandemic World

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    Now that the public health emergency has ended, employers may reevaluate their obligations to allow remote work, as well as the extent to which they must compensate remote working expenses, though it's important to examine any requests under the Americans With Disabilities Act, say Dan Kaplan and Jacqueline Hayduk at Foley & Lardner.

  • Handbook Hot Topics: Remote Work Policies

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    Implementing a remote work policy that clearly articulates eligibility, conduct and performance expectations for remote employees can ease employers’ concerns about workers they may not see on a daily basis, says Melissa Spence at Butler Snow.

  • An Overview Of Calif. Berman Hearings For Wage Disputes

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    While California's Berman hearings are pro-employee procedures that are accessible, informal and affordable mechanisms for parties filing a claim to recover unpaid wages, there are some disadvantages to the process such as delays, says David Cheng at FordHarrison.

  • No Blank Space In Case Law On Handling FMLA Abuse

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    Daniel Schwartz at Shipman & Goodwin discusses real-world case law that guides employers on how to handle suspected Family and Medical Leave Act abuse, specifically in instances where employees attended or performed in a concert while on leave — with Taylor Swift’s ongoing Eras Tour as a hypothetical backdrop.

  • Water Cooler Talk: Bias Lessons From 'Partner Track'

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    Tracey Diamond and Evan Gibbs at Troutman Pepper chat with CyberRisk Alliance's Ying Wong, about how Netflix's show "Partner Track" tackles conscious and unconscious bias at law firms, and offer some key observations for employers and their human resources departments on avoiding these biases.

  • History Supports 2nd Circ. View Of FAA Transport Exemption

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    In the circuit split over when transport workers are exempt from the Federal Arbitration Act, sparked by the 2022 U.S. Supreme Court decision in Southwest Airlines v. Saxon, the Second Circuit reached a more faithful interpretation — one supported by historical litigation and legislative context, though perhaps arrived at via the wrong route, say Joshua Wesneski and Crystal Weeks at Weil.

  • Employers Need Clarity On FLSA Joint Employer Liability

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    A judicial patchwork of multifactor tests to determine joint employment liability has led to unpredictable results, and only congressional action or enactment of a uniform standard to which courts will consistently defer can give employers the clarity needed to structure their relationships with workers, say attorneys at Seyfarth.

  • Calif. Independent Contractor Lessons From Grubhub Suit

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    California courts have been creating little in the way of clarity when it comes to the employment status of gig workers — and a recent federal court decision in Lawson v. Grubhub illustrates how status may change with the winds of litigation, offering four takeaways for businesses that rely on delivery drivers, say Esra Hudson and Marah Bragdon at Manatt.

  • Labor Collusion Loss Will Shape DOJ's Case Strategy

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    Following the U.S. Department of Justice’s recent loss in United States v. Manahe, tallying its trial score record to 0-3 in labor-related antitrust cases over the past year, defendants can expect that the DOJ will try to exclude defense evidence and argue for more favorable jury instructions, say attorneys at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Staffing Company Considerations Amid PAGA Uncertainty

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    The impending California Supreme Court decision in Adolph v. Uber is expected to affect staffing companies, specifically how the proliferation of nonindividual Private Attorneys General Act claims are handled when the individual claim is compelled to arbitration, say Sarah Kroll-Rosenbaum and Harrison Thorne at Akerman.

  • Eye On Compliance: Joint Employment

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    Madonna Herman at Wilson Elser breaks down the key job conditions that led to a recent National Labor Relations Board finding of joint employment, and explains the similar standard established under California case law — providing a guide for companies that want to minimize liability when relying on temporary and contract workers.

  • How Unions Could Stem Possible Wave Of Calif. PAGA Claims

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    Should the California Supreme Court hold in Adolph v. Uber that the nonindividual portions of Private Attorneys General Act claims survive even after individual claims go to arbitration, employers and unions could both leverage the holding in Oswald v. Murray to stifle the resurgence in representative suits, say attorneys at Greenberg Traurig.