Florida

  • May 09, 2024

    Fla. Justices Let More Law Grads Work Before Admission

    Certain graduates of accredited law schools can work for up to 18 months in Florida under the same restrictions as students from law school practice programs after the state Supreme Court ordered a rule change Thursday.

  • May 09, 2024

    Mobile Carriers Pay $10M To End 50 AGs' Deceptive Ad Claims

    A coalition of nearly all the country's state attorneys general on Thursday announced $10.25 million in settlements that AT&T, Verizon and T-Mobile have agreed to pay to end a multistate probe into the wireless carriers' allegedly misleading advertising practices.

  • May 09, 2024

    11th Circ. Rejects Monsanto's Roundup Suit Redo Request

    The full Eleventh Circuit has rejected Monsanto's renewed request for review of a panel's ruling that a Georgia doctor can allege the company failed to warn about cancer risks associated with the use of Roundup weedkiller despite federal pesticide labeling requirements.

  • May 09, 2024

    Fla. Justices Say Widow Is Surviving Spouse Under The Law

    The Florida Supreme Court ruled Thursday that the widow of a mesothelioma victim who married her spouse after his injury can be considered a surviving spouse under the state's Wrongful Death Act.

  • May 09, 2024

    Trump SPAC Investor Convicted Of Insider Trading

    A Manhattan federal jury on Thursday convicted a Florida investment pro of securities fraud and conspiracy for allegedly exploiting confidential plans to take Donald Trump's media company Truth Social public in a $23 million insider trading case.

  • May 09, 2024

    Justices Say Copyright Damages Can Go Beyond 3 Years

    The U.S. Supreme Court concluded Thursday that plaintiffs in copyright ownership disputes can recover damages beyond the three-year statute of limitations for bringing a claim, rejecting Warner Chappell Music's argument that the only time that could happen is in cases involving fraud.

  • May 08, 2024

    Mayer Brown, Latham Steer Proficient Auto's $215M IPO

    Proficient Auto Logistics Inc. on Wednesday priced a $215 million initial public offering within its range, represented by Mayer Brown LLP and underwriters' counsel Latham & Watkins LLP, in an IPO that will help the specialized freight company combine five logistics businesses into one publicly traded entity. 

  • May 08, 2024

    Fla. Man Owes $2.3M Tax For Late Mother's Estate, US Says

    A Florida man spent millions of dollars on mortgage payments on his and his family members' properties using funds from his late mother's estate instead of paying the more than $2.3 million in taxes that the estate owed, the government said in its bid for an early win.

  • May 08, 2024

    Fla. Defense Contractor Admits To Selling Parts From Turkey

    A Florida defense contractor has pled guilty to federal conspiracy charges in connection to a scheme to defraud the U.S. Department of Defense, admitting that she violated export control laws by using a front company to supply critical military components that were manufactured in Turkey.

  • May 08, 2024

    Digitex Founder Pleads Guilty To Bank Secrecy Act Violation

    The founder of Digitex Futures Exchange has pled guilty to violating the Bank Secrecy Act by refusing to implement policies designed to prevent money laundering on his cryptocurrency futures platform.

  • May 08, 2024

    Film Investor Wins $19M Verdict Against Producer

    A Canadian film producer was hit Wednesday with a more than $19 million jury verdict after he failed to show up at trial in Florida federal court over claims he allegedly defrauded an investor out of millions of dollars meant to fund several productions.

  • May 08, 2024

    Truth Social Backer's Insider Trading Alibi In Jury's Hands

    A Manhattan federal jury weighed charges Wednesday against a Florida investor accused of fueling a $23 million insider trading scheme that exploited confidential plans to take Truth Social public, after the defense argued it was someone else who tipped speculators.

  • May 08, 2024

    Fla. Lab Owner Gets 10 Years For Unneeded Medical Tests

    A Florida medical lab owner has been sentenced to 10 years in prison after pleading guilty to charges related to accusations that he billed Medicare for $53 million in unnecessary genetic cancer screening tests.

  • May 08, 2024

    Biden Picks US Magistrate Judge In Fla. For 11th Circ.

    President Joe Biden announced Wednesday his intent to nominate U.S. Magistrate Judge Embry J. Kidd to the Eleventh Circuit.

  • May 07, 2024

    Canadian Film Producer Skips Fla. Trial On Fraud Allegations

    A Canadian film producer accused of defrauding an investor out of more than $13 million to fund several productions was a no-show at his Florida federal civil trial on Tuesday after informing the court a day earlier that he wouldn't attend because he isn't represented by counsel.

  • May 07, 2024

    Trump Media Co-Founders Seek Chancery Contempt Order

    Two early investors in Trump Media & Technology Group have called for a Delaware Court of Chancery contempt ruling against Donald Trump's Truth Social media company, saying its attempt to claim their shares in a Florida lawsuit contradicted earlier representations in Delaware.

  • May 07, 2024

    Florida Judge Delays Trump's Classified Docs Trial Indefinitely

    The Florida judge overseeing the criminal case that accuses former President Donald Trump of holding onto classified documents upon leaving office extended indefinitely the planned May 20 start of the trial, citing "myriad and interconnected pretrial" issues regarding the Classified Information Procedures Act, according to a federal court order filed on Tuesday.

  • May 07, 2024

    Everton Investors Bemoan Soccer Team Sale Amid Fraud Suit

    The Everton FC Shareholders Association wants to slam the brakes on the "farce" sale of its Premier League soccer team to private equity firm 777 Partners LLC, arguing they are not qualified owners, a demand that comes as the firm faces allegations of fraud.

  • May 07, 2024

    Feds Tell 11th Circ. Justices' Ruling Saves DHS Parole Policies

    The Biden administration has urged the Eleventh Circuit to vacate separate decisions from a Florida federal judge striking down two U.S. Department of Homeland Security parole policies, saying U.S. Supreme Court precedent mandates that outcome.

  • May 07, 2024

    Fla. Schools And Hospitals Fight To Save Opioid Claims

    Five public hospital districts and two school districts told a Florida appeals court Tuesday that their claims for damages from the opioid crisis should not be eclipsed by the attorney general's settlements with opioid makers and distributors, arguing that she did not have the authority to bring claims on their behalf.

  • May 07, 2024

    Steward Health Gets Ch. 11 Loan, Says It Plans Hospital Sales

    A Texas bankruptcy judge Tuesday allowed Steward Health Care to take out $75 million in Chapter 11 financing to meet its next-day payroll after being told the hospital chain plans to sell facilities to pay down its $9 billion in debt.

  • May 07, 2024

    Panera To Nix 'Charged' Drink At Center Of Death Suits

    Panera Bread Co. will soon no longer serve its "Charged Lemonade," the caffeinated drink at the center of two lawsuits that claim the restaurant chain is liable for the wrongful death of two patrons.

  • May 07, 2024

    Truth Social Investor Grilled By Feds At Insider Trading Trial

    A Florida investment pro on trial for allegedly exploiting confidential plans to take Truth Social public in a $23 million insider trading case was challenged Tuesday by prosecutors on the timing of trades and communications before the "special" media deal.

  • May 07, 2024

    NC Firm Beats Appeal In Fee Fight With Fla. Client

    A North Carolina state appeals court on Tuesday affirmed a lower court's denial of a motion to dismiss a breach-of-contract lawsuit filed by Raleigh-based law firm Wilson Ratledge PLLC, agreeing the fee dispute with two Florida-based companies falls under the state court's jurisdiction.

  • May 07, 2024

    Fla. Court Mulls Bid To Unmask DeSantis' Judicial Advisers

    An anonymous Florida resident urged a state appeals court on Tuesday to reverse the dismissal of a petition to force Gov. Ron DeSantis to turn over information about the conservative advisers he consults to vet judicial nominees, arguing that the governor can't use executive privilege to hide from a public records request.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Serving As A Sheriff's Deputy Made Me A Better Lawyer

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    Skills developed during my work as a reserve deputy — where there was a need to always be prepared, decisive and articulate — transferred to my practice as an intellectual property litigator, and my experience taught me that clients often appreciate and relate to the desire to participate in extracurricular activities, says Michael Friedland at Friedland Cianfrani.

  • Former Minn. Chief Justice Instructs On Writing Better Briefs

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    Former Minnesota Supreme Court Chief Justice Lorie Gildea, now at Greenberg Traurig, offers strategies on writing more effective appellate briefs from her time on the bench.

  • Stay Interviews Are Key To Retaining Legal Talent

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    Even as the economy shifts and layoffs continue, law firms still want to retain their top attorneys, and so-called stay interviews — informal conversations with employees to identify potential issues before they lead to turnover — can be a crucial tool for improving retention and morale, say Tina Cohen Nicol and Kate Reder Sheikh at Major Lindsey.

  • And Now A Word From The Panel: Benefits Of MDL Transfers

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    A recent order from the Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation highlights a critical part of the panel's work — moving cases into an existing MDL — and serves as a reminder that common arguments against such transfers don't outweigh the benefits of coordinating discovery and utilizing lead counsel, says Alan Rothman at Sidley Austin.

  • What Rescheduling Could Mean For Cannabis Bankruptcies

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    Bankruptcy courts have historically been closed for cannabis-related businesses, but recent case law coupled with a possible reclassification of cannabis provides cautious optimism, say attorneys at Duane Morris.

  • A Defense Strategy For Addressing Copyright Fee-Shifting

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    Permissive fee-shifting under Section 505 of the Copyright Act poses unique challenges for copyright defendants, carrying an outsize impact on the economic incentive structure in copyright litigation, but relying on a Federal Rule of Civil Procedure may offer a potential solution by allowing defendants to recover attorney fees, say Hugh Marbury and Molly Shaffer at Cozen O'Connor.

  • Series

    Spray Painting Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My experiences as an abstract spray paint artist have made me a better litigator, demonstrating — in more ways than one — how fluidity and flexibility are necessary parts of a successful legal practice, says Erick Sandlin at Bracewell.

  • Opinion

    Judicial Independence Is Imperative This Election Year

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    As the next election nears, the judges involved in the upcoming trials against former President Donald Trump increasingly face political pressures and threats of violence — revealing the urgent need to safeguard judicial independence and uphold the rule of law, says Benes Aldana at the National Judicial College.

  • Series

    Riding My Peloton Bike Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Using the Peloton platform for cycling, running, rowing and more taught me that fostering a mind-body connection will not only benefit you physically and emotionally, but also inspire stamina, focus, discipline and empathy in your legal career, says Christopher Ward at Polsinelli.

  • The Challenges SEC's Climate Disclosure Rule May Face

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    Attorneys at Debevoise examine potential legal challenges to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's new climate-related disclosure rule — against which nine suits have already been filed — including arguments under the Administrative Procedure Act, the major questions doctrine, the First Amendment and the nondelegation doctrine.

  • Class Actions At The Circuit Courts: March Lessons

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    In this month's review of class action appeals, Mitchell Engel at Shook Hardy discusses four notable circuit court decisions on topics from consumer fraud to employment — and provides key takeaways for counsel on issues including coercive communications with putative class members and Article III standing at the class certification stage.

  • Spartan Arbitration Tactics Against Well-Funded Opponents

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    Like the ancient Spartans who held off a numerically superior Persian army at the Battle of Thermopylae, trial attorneys and clients faced with arbitration against an opponent with a bigger war chest can take a strategic approach to create a pass to victory, say Kostas Katsiris and Benjamin Argyle at Venable.

  • What Recent Study Shows About AI's Promise For Legal Tasks

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    Amid both skepticism and excitement about the promise of generative artificial intelligence in legal contexts, the first randomized controlled trial studying its impact on basic lawyering tasks shows mixed but promising results, and underscores the need for attorneys to proactively engage with AI, says Daniel Schwarcz at University of Minnesota Law School.

  • 11th Circ. FMLA Ruling Deepens Divide Over Causation

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    The Eleventh Circuit's recent ruling in Lapham v. Walgreen distinguishes the circuit as the loudest advocate for the but-for causation standard for assessing Family and Medical Leave Act retaliation claims, though employers in other jurisdictions may encounter less favorable standards and the U.S. Supreme Court will likely have to address the circuit split eventually, say attorneys at Benesch.

  • Business Litigators Have A Source Of Untapped Fulfillment

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    As increasing numbers of attorneys struggle with stress and mental health issues, business litigators can find protection against burnout by remembering their important role in society — because fulfillment in one’s work isn’t just reserved for public interest lawyers, say Bennett Rawicki and Peter Bigelow at Hilgers Graben.

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